l i e b l i n g s s

J. P. Tran.
Art is my muse.

May 21, 2014 at 9:07am
0 notes
We made dandelion crowns and beds for ants

#flowerchild

We made dandelion crowns and beds for ants

#flowerchild

9:07am
0 notes
Real Gabinete Português de Leitura in Rio de Janeiro is one of the most beautiful library in the world. It houses 35,000 books and built by Rafael de Silva de Castra from 1880-1887. #bucketlist #finerthingsinlife

Real Gabinete Português de Leitura in Rio de Janeiro is one of the most beautiful library in the world. It houses 35,000 books and built by Rafael de Silva de Castra from 1880-1887. #bucketlist #finerthingsinlife

February 13, 2014 at 10:21am
2,249 notes
Reblogged from showslow

showslow:

Figurative Paintings by Lee Price | Previously

Gorgeous paintings by Lee Price

January 12, 2014 at 12:25pm
728 notes
Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Viviane Sassen. Flamboya.

Traveller

Anansi

Darkuman Junction

DNA

Elvis

Man and Woman

Milk

Website

December 9, 2013 at 11:56pm
2,074 notes
Reblogged from likeafieldmouse

likeafieldmouse:

Zhang Huan - Ash Buddha (2007)

December 8, 2013 at 2:34pm
4,112 notes
Reblogged from archatlas

archatlas:

Marcus Møller Bitsch

(via leslieseuffert)

October 21, 2013 at 10:55pm
5 notes
Georges Braque, Le musicienne, 1917
The definitive representation of the “fleeting moment”.
"Cubism was a singular event in the history of art, you might say the most astounding transformation in the entire history of art. In Cubist painting, solid, apprehensible reality, located in space and fixed in time, crumbled; and, like Humpty Dumpty, its pieces could not be reassembled. Objects fractured into visual fragments then were rearranged so that the viewer would not have to move through space in an allotted period of time in order to view them in sequence. VIsual segments of the front, back, top, bottom, and sides of an object jump out and assault the viewer’s eye simultaneously.” - Leonard Shlain, Art and Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light

Georges Braque, Le musicienne, 1917

The definitive representation of the “fleeting moment”.

"Cubism was a singular event in the history of art, you might say the most astounding transformation in the entire history of art. In Cubist painting, solid, apprehensible reality, located in space and fixed in time, crumbled; and, like Humpty Dumpty, its pieces could not be reassembled. Objects fractured into visual fragments then were rearranged so that the viewer would not have to move through space in an allotted period of time in order to view them in sequence. VIsual segments of the front, back, top, bottom, and sides of an object jump out and assault the viewer’s eye simultaneously.” - Leonard Shlain, Art and Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light

October 20, 2013 at 10:01pm
23 notes

Eastern and Western concepts of time are as different as the two conceptions of space. In the West most people believe the past is something we have left behind and cannot see unless we turn around, while the present is where we exist momentarily as we stride confidently facing forward into the future, in front of us. But in a more accurate metaphor, the Chinese liken time to a river and human awareness to a man standing on its bank facing downstream. The future approaches him from behind and becomes the present only when it arrives alongside where he is standing and he is first conscious of it out of the corner of his eye. Thus, before he can assimilate the present, it is past already. The present washes away to become history in front of the observer. The recent past is nearer and it can be seen more clearly. The distant past is far away ahead of him, its features only dimly perceivable. Instead of squarely facing the oncoming future in the Western metaphor, this more accurate allegory acknowledges how the present, as we all know, continuously blindsides us from an angle of vision that assures that we will be unprepared.

— Leonard Shlain, Art and Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light

5:27pm
55 notes
Reblogged from pourtoutlartdumonde

pourtoutlartdumonde:

Borondo -Espagne- « glass scratching » 

Comme Vhils (http://pourtoutlartdumonde.tumblr.com/post/62881665148/vhils-portugal-street-art-ecologique-vhils), Borondo participe à la réinvention du street art, sa dernière trouvaille : le « glass scratching » ou « grattage de verre ». 

« Là où la crise a frappé, il y a beaucoup de magasins fermés et vides. Tu grattes un peu la vitre et soudainement tu peux voir à l’intérieur. Je trouve ça assez poétique, le verre a quelque chose de magique. Des fois je fais l’inverse : je peins des spots publicitaires lumineux en noir et je laisse transparaître la lumière en grattant. » Il confesse que cette technique a également un avantage pratique : « C’est une astuce pour ne pas être arrêté par la police : techniquement, tu es juste en train d’effacer de la peinture sur une vitre. »

(via lustik)

June 3, 2013 at 4:04pm
6,599 notes
Reblogged from likeafieldmouse

likeafieldmouse:

Tom Phillips - A Humument (1966-73)

“In 1966 Phillips set himself a task: to find a second-hand book for threepence and alter every page by painting, collage and cut-up techniques to create an entirely new version. He found his threepenny novel in a junkshop on Peckham Rye, South London. This was an 1892 Victorian obscurity titled A Human Document by W.H Mallock and he titled his altered book A Humument.

The first version of all 367 treated pages was published in 1973 since when there have been four revised editions. A Humument is now one of the best known and loved of all 20th Century artist’s books and is regarded as a seminal classic of postmodern art.”

(via arpeggia)